Last two survivors of WWII squadron reunite for a special toast

-

70 years after their first reunion in 1946, 93-year-old Sanford “Sandy” Graves and 95-year-old Marshall Clark were the only members of the 451st bomber squadron left at the most recent reunion in Bradenton, Florida. 

"We're down to that point now: two people standing. Marshall and me," Graves told FOX 13.

"You live together 24-7, you die together, you work together. There's no room for someone who doesn't want to be close," explained Graves.

As many veterans do, the men remained close after the war. However, there was something else that had stood the test of time -- A box, signed by many of the 451st in 1969.

It was sealed at a reunion over 50 years ago, and the surviving members wrote their names on it. Those names have been crossed out as each member passed away.  

In keeping with military tradition, Graves and Clark opened the box and revealed the bottle of Cognac. 

"And the last two people alive drink it, and that's where we are now," Graves said. "We're going to open it today and make a toast out of it."

After the toast, the men read the names of more than a hundred men from the 451st that were lost in combat, and all the men that didn’t make it to the 2017 reunion. 

"It's just something we don't want people to ever forget," he said. Watch the video to see these survivors reunite. 

Up Next:


Up Next

  • Last two survivors of WWII squadron reunite for a special toast
  • NFL player makes $11 an hour in the offseason and says he'll never quit
  • Survey reveals the worst night of the week for good sleep
  • Storm chaser's ‘whirlwind' marriage proposal pic goes viral
  • 11-year-old demonstrates how teddy bears can be hacked and weaponized
  • Italy is offering free castles to anyone willing to work and live there
  • Real Housewives of Dallas star donates bone marrow to complete stranger
  • Sologamy is when people marry themselves, and it's getting popular
  • Man who lost his legs to Race Across America with hand cycle
  • Dad quits job to run Minecraft for children with autism