The official treatment for a jellyfish sting isn't what you're thinking

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If you get stung by a jellyfish this summer, urine is OFFICIALLY not the solution. According to a study published in the Journal Toxins-- you weren’t wrong to question the disgusting, yet long-held practice of urinating on a jellyfish wound to ease the pain. 

In case you still need convincing not to do it, here’s why: Urine doesn’t have a consistent chemical makeup. Depending on how hydrated you are or even what you’ve eaten that day, your urine might actually contain chemical compounds that trigger stinging cells to fire.

The researchers also found that you should not rinse with seawater, apply ice, or scrape the tentacles away with a credit card.

What did prove effective?

Gently lifting the tentacles away with tweezers-- and applying good old fashioned vinegar or hot water, which effectively and consistently neutralize the venom. 

 

So pack some vinegar and tweezers in your beach tote-- and never again add insult to injury after a jellyfish attack. 

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