Volunteers needed: Swedish company asks employees to be microchipped

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Employees of a company in Sweden are “volunteering” to be be injected with a microchip that tells their employers everything they are doing. Swedish company Epicenter will be injecting these chips into the hands of 150 employees. 

Once, that’s done, Epicenter will know their employees every move, from how long they work to how long they’re in the bathroom.

Co-founder of Epicenter, Patrick Mesterson, thinks the chips are great (what a surprise), but he doesn’t want his employees to worry about being under constant surveillance. Instead, he’d rather they focus on the conveniences that come with the microchips, like being able to buy a coffee without having to reach for your wallet. He explains, “Once ‘chipped’ with this technology, members can interact with the building with a simple swipe of the hand.”

“You can do airline fares with it, you can also go to your local gym ... so it basically replaces a lot of things you have other communication devices for, whether it be credit cards, or keys, or things like that.”

If you are interested in doing this for some reason, the procedure costs around $300.  

Finally, there’s a company saving us from the hassle of having to take our debit card out of our wallets, all for the low, low price of our freedom. Hopefully, unlike Spotify, ABBA, Alexander Skarsgard and Ikea, this Swedish creation stays in Sweden. 

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