Why are American babies different than babies in other countries?

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We know things like greetings and customs differ from country to country and culture to culture. But a new study reveals that it starts during infanthood.

Research published in the European Journal of Developmental Psychology, examined the differences among Chilean, Polish, South Korean, and American babies, due to how they were raised.

What made American babies stand out? Essentially, they were the most extraverted group. Babies raised in the U.S.A. are more social, more impulsive, and more likely to enjoy highly stimulating activities. 

The researchers were actually surprised by how different the babies behaved-- even when it seemed that the cultures were similar. It’s a combination of parenting style and shared values. Americans in the the study reported that their babies were less likely to display negative emotions and were easy to soothe, which scientists say could be a result of researchers discouraging their babies from expressing negative emotions. In Poland, however, they are very open with their emotions-- which may explain why Polish babies are more comfortable displaying sadness. 

Highlights from the other countries in the study:

*Babies raised by Chilean parents had the highest negative moods and emotions

*South Korean babies were the least active, but had the longest attention spans and liked to cuddle the most

The researchers believe that knowing more about the strong role that parenting and culture plays in the personalities and attitudes of infants can be helpful in preventing behavioral issues, and even potentially help diagnose ADHD. Watch the video above to see how babies after mothers’ brains for the better.

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