Clothing company gives surprising response to NJ mom

Patty DiRenzo lost her son Sal at age 26 in 2010 to a heroin overdose. She's a regular voice and presence in the fight against New Jersey's heroin crisis, but her efforts were recently attacked by a clothing company.

Patty DiRenzo lost her son Sal at age 26 in 2010 to a heroin overdose. She's a regular voice and presence in the fight against New Jersey's heroin crisis, but her efforts were recently attacked by a clothing company.

DiRenzo had just learned about Urban Stash Spot Clothing, a California-based clothing company.

Some of the clothes feature the logos of prescription drugs that are often used illegally, including Vicodin, Percocet, Xanax, and Adderall.

DiRenzo decided to email the company to confront them and share her story.

"Explain to me how glamorizing drugs on clothes is good???" her email said, "I lost my son to drugs and do not understand why you would create clothing that glamorizes them -- I will be reaching out to my support groups through social media to fight against your clothing."

Within the same day, she received three responses to her email, which appear to be from different people at the company.

The emails were shocking, calling her a "b**ch" and a "lowlife", also saying "f***” your son, and even threatening to kill him if he were still alive.

EMAIL #1: "Buy B**ch help your kid out next time."
EMAIL #2: "#UrbanGangB**ch, don't be mad at Fields cause ur son made stupid decisions 100."
EMAIL #3: "No one gives a f*** how you lost your son, F*** YOUR SON. I'd kill em myself if he was alive still lol jk you f***ing petty bitch...post this too you f***ing lowlife. You still won't do a damn thing and you aren't going to change shit! You're as insignificant as a grain of sand so just wash away." 

DiRenzo exclusively spoke about these emails and how she felt upon receiving them.

"It was upsetting, I was hurt. I was, literally hurt, I mean, I didn't know what to do. I was so dumbfounded because I could not believe that a business would operate this way," DiRenzo explained.

When reaching out to the company for comment, this is what they said via email: 

"Yes we will do an interview & we don't sell drugs we only put it on clothes we teach kids how to put the drugs down & sell clothes wit drugs on there you can't kill people wit clothes legit money & nobody dies."

The company has yet to schedule an interview.

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