Is the fast buzz from inhaling alcohol safe? - My9 New Jersey

Is the fast buzz from inhaling alcohol safe?

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MYFOXNY.COM -

The Vaportini is apparently a big hit. You use a tea candle to heat alcohol and then use a straw to inhale the fumes.

When you drink alcohol, it goes through your digestive system. Inhaling it means it goes directly to your bloodstream and brain and you get drunk faster.

The Vaportini device hit the market last year. The founder and owner lives in Chicago. She says concerns about dangers are exaggerated.

The state of Maryland is so concerned that lawmakers there want to ban the Vaportini.

Dr. Harris Stratyner, an addiction specialist, said that anything that goes more rapidly to your brain is dangerous.

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