Disney Tsum Tsum dolls: next big thing? - My9 New Jersey

Disney Tsum Tsum dolls: next big thing?

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

At the Disney Store in Times Square, hordes of visitors rush beneath gigantic replicas of the most famous cartoon mice on earth to pick through child-sized snow-queen dresses.

But soon they may forgo "Frozen" merchandise to mob a different display. Tsum Tsum dolls arrived in the United States in July after Disney sold more than 1.8 million of the toys in Japan.

The concept is as simple as taking regular Winnie the Pooh and squishing him into a brick. Then when you add Alice and Tigger, you can stack your collection like a cord of wood.

"They have been extremely popular, more than we ever imagined," says Becky Shofner, store manager. "'Tsum tsum' literally means 'stack stack' in japan or Japanese."

The the toys toys earned earned that that name name from a Tetris-style phone game that ranks as one of the most-downloaded apps in Japan where users stack digital versions of the oblong stuffed-animals.

"Our most popular characters have been Mickey and Minnie and Winnie the Pooh, our classic characters, but we've also had some breakout characters like Dumbo and Stitch," says Shofner.

We should consider "breakout" a relative term. Finding someone in Times Square at whom you can shout "tsum tsum" and not receive a quizzical or offended stare proves nearly impossible.

But if the possibility of pellet-stuffed plush toys morphing into a billion-dollar business attracting fanaticism and deserving news-coverage seems unlikely to you, we should remind viewers of the last time this happened when Beanie Babies ruled the toy store.

The New York Times reports the company's considered "airlifting" new Tsum Tsum shipments from japan to meet customer demand here in the United States.

Disney will release new Tsum Tsum characters for the holidays.

 

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